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Excerpt - Please note that this is a partial sample. 
Granny's teeth sleep in a jar. 
It's right there by her bed.
She takes them out when it gets dark.
At least that's what she said.

I slept at Granny's house last night,
excited but homesick too.
When Granny saw I felt that way, 
she knew just what to do.
"Who's that?" I yelled with a muffled scream.
It is I, Granny's teeth, and it's not a dream.
Settle back and listen for there's nothing to fear.
I've got enough stories to last for a year.

Blibity blabity
clickity clack,
I talked to the teeth, 
and the teeth talked back. 
I'll lend you my false choppers
so you'll have a little piece of me
surrounding you with lots of love,
to keep you company.

 It seemed a bit unusual.
I would've preferred a nice stuffed bear.
But I didn't hurt her feelings.
It was nice of her to share. 

"Good night," said Grandpa.
"Ga nifem" gummed Granny.
"Hello, said the teeth.
Clickity click, clackity clatter
They talked to me all night long
If it wasn't tales about the good old days,
they were signing some wacky old song.

Or listing all of my relatives
born after nineteen sixty-four,
(I hate to have to say it, 
but the teeth were quite a bore)
                                                                  
World War I, then World War II.
Best recipe for lentil stew.
Milking cows when Gran was ten.
How food was so much fresher then. 
 
KIRKUS REVIEW 
A debut collection of rhyming stories centers on the lives of children in an effort to both entertain and educate. Cooper’s series of “quirky tales” relayed in this work range from dentures that talk by themselves to soap suds that cause a school’s cancellation and a list of overly strict recess rules. The protagonists are generally children or their parents, grandparents, or teachers, and the stories frequently resolve in a whimsical fashion. At the end of each poem there is a question for young readers and adults to reflect on and consider. There is a list of general questions at the end about the book as a whole as well as more in-depth questions for each story. The text is punctuated by black-and-white stock photographs, mostly of diverse children enacting the various events of each tale. There are intentional incidents of a poem’s rhyme scheme or meter changing in an effort to allow readers to identify switches in style. But this occasionally makes the work feel uneven. But the author, who is a retired school system reading supervisor, provides lively subject matter that should appeal to early readers, allowing for an enjoyable learning activity to be undertaken with adult supervision. The questions at the end of each poem and at the book’s conclusion are insightful, and they encourage youngsters to read deeper than they might have without guidance. This volume is equally valuable as a tool for teachers in presenting their lessons or for parents in helping to boost their children’s reading comprehension. A fine work that should keep young readers engaged with fun and amusing subjects while providing a foundation for thoughtful reading practices. 
Clarion Foreword Review - Jan 2018

Clarion Rating: 4 out of 5

This wonderfully entertaining collection will prompt lifelong, enriching interaction with books. 

Retired school system reading supervisor Liz Cooper’s short and amusing collection Granny’s Teeth gathers silly stories that are told in rhymes and helps parents and caregivers turn them into wonderful learning opportunities.The collection’s stories vary greatly. “Granny’s Teeth” is about a little girl who is spending the night at her grandparents’ house. She finds that she cannot sleep after her grandmother puts her false teeth in her room to keep her company; the teeth talk all night.Some stories, like one about a boy cleaning all the windows in the house to keep his mother from noticing that he broke one, are based on the real-life experiences of Cooper and her acquaintances. Others, such as a story about a girl spilling detergent in the rain and causing a blizzard of soap suds, are clearly works of fantasy.

The stories do not relate to one another, and there is no overarching lesson. Each story is whimsical and enjoyable, and each stands on its own. Entertainingly written, they stand to appeal to children of all interests in their variety.

Stories themselves constitute a bit more than half of the book. Its second half is aimed at parents, educators, and caregivers, and outshines the stories themselves. This thoughtful second section suggests a variety of ways to interact with the stories. It is filled with questions and activities that make the early content useful for developing reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. Anyone who has ever struggled to help a young child find meaning in the words they read will find the information presented here to be of great value.

Questions about identifying parts of language, spelling, and grammar are included, as well as questions about how characters interact, their emotional responses, and the moral lessons that the stories may be trying to teach. This encouraged, wide reflection will nurture reading skills that will last a lifetime.

Granny’s Teeth is a wonderfully entertaining collection that children and adults can laugh through and enjoy together, with questions and activities that will help develop the minds of young children

 
Midwest Reviews -Children’s Bookwatch
 April 2018
Whether looking for a lost shoe, staying awake all night listening to a chatty set of dentures, or watching Grandpas hair fly away, the young characters in the fifteen quirky tales comprising "Granny's Teeth" by Liz Cooper find surprising solutions to life's unexpected events. The storylines are simple and funny, yet the themes are surprisingly complex, providing lots of opportunities for the sharing of ideas. Its fun to talk about a story, but often, its hard to know what to talk about beyond the basic plot and details. In order to encourage critical thinking, there are intriguing kid-friendly questions placed strategically at the end of each tale. This gives readers an immediate opportunity to respond to the story, whether they read it independently or with an adult. Additional questions, discussion starters, and research ideas in the 'Lets Talk About It' section of "Granny's Teeth" provide opportunities for digging deeper. Entertaining, funny, engaging, deftly crafted, thoughtful and thought-provoking, "Granny's Teeth" is a unique and unreservedly recommended addition to school and community library collections.
Blue Ink Review - Jan 2018 

A collection of “quirky rhyming tales” that occasionally recall Shel Silverstein, Granny’s Teeth adds in an educational component with questions for reader discussion.

“Bea’s Blizzard,” for example, tells the story of a girl sent to buy laundry soap who gets caught in a downpour; the subsequent suds take over the town and result in a school closure, and the product develops a fan base of school kids. A question in large type asks whether the events described could happen in real life, and four more prompt further study in the back of the book.

“The Helper” describes a child’s strategy to avoid unpacking with the family after a move, from cranking music they don’t like to obsessively popping bubble wrap. The child is finally shipped out to grandma and grandpa’s place, much to his relief.

The title story involves a night spent being lectured by a chatty pair of dentures. Upon first hearing the teeth, the speaker is understandably startled: “‘Who’s that?’ I yelled with a muffled scream./ ‘It is I, Granny’s teeth, and it’s not a dream./ Settle back and listen, for there’s nothing to fear./ I have enough stories to last for a year!)

Author Liz Cooper’s amusing rhymes generally have a moral lesson attached but sometimes give way to childish anarchy for its own sake. Reluctant readers may be drawn in by their brevity, and all youngsters will enjoy some laughs, as well as find something to think about.

The rhythm of the poems is often uneven. Revision with an eye to smoother cadence would improve this offering.

Still, the variety of subjects covered, from sand castle construction to a wind-blown toupee, improve odds that kids will find a story or theme to connect with. Overall, Granny’s Teeth will generate discussion—but it’s also just plain fun.